(L)-Ephedrine

CAS RN: 299-42-3

Key Info

CLINICAL EFFECTS

0.2.1 SUMMARY OF EXPOSURE
A) USES: Oral sympathomimetics are used as decongestants, weight loss agents, bronchodilators, anabolic bodybuilding agents, aphrodisiacs,
mood stimulants, and to stay awake.
B) PHARMACOLOGY: Clinical effect is achieved by direct binding at beta and alpha-adrenergic receptors or by indirectly causing
an increase of norepinephrine or dopamine (catecholamines) at the neural junction.
C) TOXICOLOGY: Direct receptor binding or catecholamine increase leads to a hyperadrenergic physiologic state.
D) EPIDEMIOLOGY: Toxicity is common due to the large number of agents with sympathomimetic activity. Severe poisoning is uncommon.
E) WITH THERAPEUTIC USE
1) ADVERSE EFFECTS: Adverse effects from oral sympathomimetics are common. The most common effects are hypertension, palpitations,
nausea, and restlessness.
F) WITH POISONING/EXPOSURE
1) MILD TO MODERATE TOXICITY: Most patients will experience tachycardia, hypertension, mydriasis, insomnia, headache, and agitation.
2) SEVERE TOXICITY: Large overdoses and severe toxicity may lead to seizures, hallucinations, agitated delirium, and tachydysrhythmias
including supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia. Vasospasm can lead to myocardial ischemia or focal cerebrovascular
deficits. Severe hypertension may also result in intracranial hemorrhage or renal insufficiency. Reflex bradycardia due to significant
hypertension is possible. Prolonged agitation can lead to rhabdomyolysis and hyperthermia. 1,3 DIMETHYLAMYLAMINE: Cerebral hemorrhage
has been reported in several cases of recreational use of 1,3-dimethylethylamine (DMAA). CLENBUTEROL: The beta-2 agonists (clenbuterol)
can cause significant electrolyte abnormalities including hypokalemia.

Find more information on this substance at: PubChem, PubMed