Acrolein

CAS RN: 107-02-8

Reactivities / Incompatibilities

Incompatible materials: Oxidizing agents, oxygen, bases, strong acids.
Incompatible with amines, /sulfur dioxide/, metal salts, oxidants, (light + heat). Violent polymerization reaction on contact with strong acid, strong base, weak acid conditions (e.g., nitrous fumes, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide), thiourea, or dimethylamine.
Mixing acrolein and oleum in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
Mixing acrolein and 70% nitric acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
Mixing acrolein and ethyleneimine in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
Mixing acrolein and ethylene diamine in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
Mixing acrolein and chlorosulfonic acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
Mixing acrolein and 28% ammonium hydroxide in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
Mixing acrolein and 2-aminoethanol in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
A strong reducing agent; reacts violently with oxidizers. Reacts with acids, alkalis, ammonia, amines, oxygen, peroxides. Shock-sensitive peroxides or acids may be formed over time. Attacks zinc and cadmium.
Water initiates exothermic reactions catalyzed by mineral acids & possibly some metallic salts. An interference between acrolein & water appears to promote the reaction & it is not prevented by the usual acrolein polymerization inhibitors, eg, hydroquinone or 4-methoxyphenol. The reaction can be avoided by scrupulously eliminating ionic contaminants & water layers, & maintaining reasonably low temp. To dispose of acrolein or arrest a runaway reaction, 20 or more volumes of water must be added to completely solubilize the acrolein ... .
Oxidizers, acids, alkalis, ammonia, amines [Note: polymerizes readily unless inhibited -- usually with hydroquinone. May form shock-sensitive peroxides overtime].
An extremely violent polymerization reaction of acrolein results from contact with alkaline materials such as sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, ammonia and amines. Mixing sodium hydroxide and acrolein in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
Acrolein polymerizes with release of heat on contact with minor amounts of acids (including sulfur dioxide), alkalis, volatile amines, salts, thiourea, oxidants (air) and on exposure to light and heat.
Mixing acrolein and 96% sulfuric acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase.
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