Bis(2-Chloroethyl)sulfide

CAS RN: 505-60-2

Protective Equip. / Clothing

/For rescue worker protection in the Hot Zone/ Pressure-demand, self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is recommended in response situations that involve exposure to any amount of sulfur mustard. Skin/ocular protection: Personal protective equipment (PPE) and butyl rubber chemical-protective gloves are recommended at all times when these chemicals are suspected to be involved. /Rescue workers in the decontamination zone/ ... should continue to wear the same level of protection as required in the Hot Zone.
SRP: When working with strong solutions of acids or bases or other caustic or corrosive materials, always wear a full face mask. When working with caustic or corrosive gases or vapors, a full face mask with not protect the eyes or prevent inhaling the material. A full face respirator is required.
Wear rubber gloves, overalls.
Inhalation: Hold breath until respiratory protective mask is donned. Pressure demand, self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) (SCBA CBRN, if available) is recommended in response situations to any amount of agent CBRN, Full Facepiece APR (when available) is recommended in non-routine, emergency situation environments less than IDLH but above REL or PEL levels.
Skin: Butyl rubber, neoprene, nitrile or PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) gloves, Responder CSM protective clothing including PVC boots. Eyes: Chemical goggles and face shield.
Personnel protection: ... Wear positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus. ... Wear appropriate chemical protective clothing.
Respirators chosen initially for responders into a known release area should be a positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a Level A protective suit until monitoring results allow for other decisions. OSHA would generally require these respirators to be NIOSH-certified CBRN SCBA respirators for use by employees. Some chemical warfare agents have been shown to seriously degrade and damage some respirators. Respiratory protection specifically approved by NIOSH for CBRN exposures is highly desirable but where not available, the incident commander may allow alternative suitable respirators during emergency operations. These are, depending on exposure levels, other NIOSH approved SCBAs or full-face air purifying respirators, which have been specifically tested by the manufacturer as effective against chemical warfare agents. Respirators other than SCBAs may be selected based upon accurate monitoring results with appropriate limits of detection for the subject agent. When conditions have been determined to be appropriate for the use of air purifying respirators, a NIOSH-approved CBRN APR Full Facepiece Air Purifying Respirator (APR) with a CBRN Canister, or a Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA) tested full facepiece APR with a combination organic vapor/acid gas/particulate canister may be used. A list of CBRN approved SCBA and APR may be obtained from the NIOSH website - APR or SCBA.
The recommendations for personal protective equipment (PPE) should be based on a site-based job hazard analysis of possible hazards including skin contact, air concentrations, heat stress, etc. All PPE should be used with appropriate additional administrative controls including medical surveillance, employee training, respirator fit-testing, and decontamination procedures to limit the potential for unforeseen adverse effects.
The requirements for skin protection from above the AEGL-1 but below the AEGL-2 should be focused initially on reducing the potential for contact with liquid agent residue. As airborne exposure rises above the AEGL-2 level, the potential for significant vapor absorption through the skin is possible and exposed skin should be minimized with the use of chemically protective clothing, preferably vapor tight encapsulating suits. Above AEGL-3, the incidence and severity of skin burns will increase and the use of encapsulating suits should be mandatory.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) selection guide for emergency/accident responses based on EPA's Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs).
PPE for Use in One TIme Emergency Exposures Not to Exceed 8 Hours Total

Effects for Exposures above AEGLs Respirator Guidance Skin Protection
Greater than AEGL-1: Threshold for conjunctival injection and minor discomfort Any NIOSH CBRN approved or Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA) tested SCBA or a NIOSH-approved CBRN APR Full Facepiece Air Purifying Respirator (APR) with CBRN Canister, or a Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA) tested full facepiece APR with a combination organic vapor/acid gas/particulate. canister Protect against contact with liquid residues. Minimize exposed skin and protect high contact potential skin areas using gloves and boots. Butyl rubber or impervious construction are desirable.
Greater than AEGL-2: Threshold for well-marked generalized conjunctivitis, edema photophobia and eye irritation. Potentially impacting functional abilities or ability to escape. Any NIOSH CBRN-approved or CWA tested SCBA or a NIOSH-approved CBRN APR Full Facepiece Air Purifying Respirator (APR) with a CBRN Canister, or a Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA) tested full facepiece APR with a combination organic vapor/acid gas/particulate canister. An encapsulating Level A type suit which provides skin vapor protection constructed of butyl rubber or layered impervious clothing which has received material and construction testing against specific CBRN agents by the manufacturer, the government or a third party testing agency using an accepted protocol. The NFPA 1991 Standard on Vapor-Protective Ensembles for Hazardous Materials Emergencies and the NFPA 1994 Standard on protective Ensembles for Chemical/Biological Terrorism Incidents require mandatory testing against chemical warfare agents.
Greater Than AEGL- 3 Life threatening; Threshold for sulfur mustard inhalation lethality in mice. Some studies indicate severe skin vesication from vapor exposure is likely above this level. Any NIOSH CBRN-approved or CWA tested SCBA. An encapsulating Level A type suit which provides skin vapor protection. A butyl rubber or layered impervious clothing which has received material and construction testing against specific CBRN agents by the manufacturer, the government or a third party testing agency using an accepted protocol. The NFPA 1991 Standard on Vapor-Protective Ensembles for Hazardous Materials Emergencies requires mandatory testing against chemical warfare agents.
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