Hydrogen Chloride

CAS RN: 7647-01-0

Reactivities / Incompatibilities

The aqueous solution is a strong acid. Corrosive fumes emitted on contact with air. Reacts violently with bases, oxidizers forming toxic chlorine gas. Reacts, often violently, with acetic anhydride, active metals, aliphatic amines, alkanolamines, alkylene oxides, aromatic amines, amides, 2-aminoethanol, ammonia, ammonium hydroxide, calcium phosphide, chlorosulfonic acid, ethylene diamine, ethyleneimine, epichlorohydrin, isocyanates, metal acetylides, oleum, organic anhydrides, perchloric acid, 3-propiolactone, uranium phosphide, sulfuric acid, vinyl acetate, vinylidene fluoride. Highly corrosive to most metals, forming flammable hydrogen gas. Attacks some plastics, rubber, and coatings.
Hydrochloric acid and hydrogen chloride react violently with many metals, with the generation of highly flammable hydrogen gas, which may explode. Reaction with oxidizers such as permanganates, chlorates, chlorites, and hypochlorites may produce chlorine or bromine gas.
Anhydrous hydrogen chloride is rapidly absorbed in water to form corrosive hydrochloric acid. Aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions are quite reactive. Reacts vigorously with alkalies and with many organic materials. Strong oxidizing materials cause release of chlorine. /Hydrogen chloride, anhydrous hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid/
Cesium acetylene carbide burns in hydrogen chloride gas.
Lithium silicide in contact with hydrogen chloride becomes incandescent. When dilute hydrochloric acid is used, gas spontaneously flammable in air is evolved.
Magnesium boride, when treated with concentrated hydrochloric acid produces spontaneously flammable gas.
Rubidium acetylene carbide burns with slightly warm hydrochloric acid or with molten sulfur. Rubidium carbide ignites in contact with hydrochloric acid unless acid is dilute.
Uranium phosphide reacts with hydrochloric acid to release spontaneously flammable phosphine.
Calcium carbide reacts with hydrogen chloride gas with incandescence.
Calcium phosphide and hydrochloric acid undergo very energetic reaction.
Absorption of gaseous hydrogen chloride on mercuric sulfate becomes violent at 125 deg C.
The reaction of silver perchlorate with carbon tetrachloride in the presence of small amount of hydrochloric acid produces trichloromethyl perchlorate, which detonates at 40 deg C.
Aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions react with most metals, forming flammable hydrogen gas. /Hydrogen chloride, anhydrous hydrogen chloride, refrigerated liquid/
Hydroxides, amines, alkalis, copper, brass, zinc [Note: Hydrochloric acid is highly corrosive to most metals].
With sulfuric acid: Accidental addition of 6,500 liters of concn hydrochloric acid to a bulk sulfuric acid storage tank released sufficient hydrogen chloride by dehydration to cause the tank to explode violently. Complete dehydration of hydrochloric acid solution releases some 250 volumes of gas.
Cesium carbide ignites in contact with hydrochloric acid unless acid is dilute.
Sodium explodes on contact with hydrochloric acid.
Sodium reacts very vigorously with gaseous hydrogen chloride.
Magnesium boride, when treated with concentrated hydrochloric acid, produces a spontaneously flammable gas.
Mixing hydrochloric acid and 28% ammonia in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. /Hydrochloric acid/
Mixing 36% hydrochloric acid and 96% sulfuric acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. /Hydrochloric acid/
The hydronium compound /with perchloric acid/ decomposes spontaneously with violence. /Hydrochloric acid/
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