Chlorine

CAS RN: 7782-50-5

Clinical Signs and Symptoms

Signs Symptoms

Clinical Signs and Symptoms

  • Respiratory - being water soluble, is primarily absorbed by the upper airway.
  • Exposure to low concentrations (1-10ppm) may cause eye and nasal irritation, sore throat and cough.
  • Inhalation of higher concentrations (>15 ppm) can very rapidly lead to respiratory distress. This can occur almost immediately with initial symptoms of stridor, followed shortly by wheezing, rales, hemoptysis, and subsequent pulmonary edema. Clinical signs of pulmonary edema will present 2-4 hours following a moderate exposure and 30 - 60 minutes following a severe exposure. Immediate onset of laryngospasm with respiratory arrest can occur.
  • Cardiovascular - initial tachycardia and hypertension followed by hypotension may occur.
  • Gastrointestinal - ingestion of chlorine can cause significant esophageal and stomach injury. Odynophagia, drooling and refusal of food suggest a more significant injury. Substernal chest pain, abdominal pain and rigidity suggest profound injury and potential perforation of the esophagus and/or stomach.
  • Dermal - chlorine causes skin irritation and with sufficient concentration can cause, burning pain, inflammation, and blisters. Liquefied chlorine can cause frostbite injury.
  • Ocular - low vapor concentrations can cause burning, redness, conjunctivitis, and tearing. Higher concentrations may result in corneal burns.
  • Link to Hospital Clinical Signs and Symptoms
  • Link to Toxic Syndromes
  • Link to Primary and Secondary Survey
Find more information on this substance at: PubChem, PubMed