Hydrogen cyanide

CAS RN: 74-90-8

Other Preventive Measures

In developing hydrogen cyanide emergency procedures, the following should be kept in mind: (1) The plan must be concise. If it is complicated, it will not serve its purpose. (2) Any plan adopted in any particular plant should be well known to all in that plant. (3) Each individual in the plant should know what he personally must do immediately in the event of an HCN emergency. (4) Any worker whose clothing has absorbed HCN liquid or gas should remove this clothing immediately. Workers wearing respiratory protective devices should not remove them until their clothing has been removed or thoroughly rinsed off. The buddy system should be used in all emergency work in an HCN contaminated area. /Hydrogen cyanide and cyanide salts/
Check all valves before and after withdrawing hydrogen cyanide from cylinders. Never trap liquid hydrogen cyanide between two valves.
Two physician's treatment kits shall be immediately available to trained medical personnel at each plant where there is a potential for the release of, accidental or otherwise, or for contact with, hydrogen cyanide or cyanide salts. ... First-aid kits shall be immediately available at workplaces where there is potential for the release, accidental or otherwise, of hydrogen cyanide or a potential for exposure to cyanide salts. ... Pertinent medical records shall be maintained ... /SRP: for the duraton of employment plus 50 years [29 CFR 1910.1020]/ following the last exposure to hydrogen cyanide or cyanide salts. /Hydrogen cyanide and cyanide salts/
Do not eat, drink, or smoke during work. Wash hands before eating.
Work clothing that becomes wet should be immediately removed due to its flammability hazard (i.e., for liquids with a flash point less than 100 deg F).
The worker should immediately wash the skin when it becomes contaminated.
Skin: Remove contaminated clothes. Rinse skin with plenty of water or shower. ... Eyes: First rinse with plenty of water for several minutes (remove contact lenses if easily possible), then seek medical attention immediately. Ingestion: Rinse mouth. ... Seek medical attention immediately. ...Wet contaminated clothing should be removed and the underlying skin washed with soap and water or water alone for 2-3 minutes.
If the clothing is to be laundered or otherwise cleaned to remove the cyanide, the person performing the operation should be informed of cyanide's hazardous properties. /Cyanides/
Food storage, preparation, and eating shall be prohibited in areas where HCN is used. Smoking and the carrying of tobacco and other smoking materials shall also be prohibited in these areas. Clean and sanitary lunchroom facilities, if provided, must be in non-exposure areas. Work clothing which has been contaminated by absorption of, or contact with, cyanide shall be thoroughly laundered before it is worn again. Clothing-change and locker-room facilities shall be provided in a non-exposure area. Workers should be encouraged to shower after work and to change work clothing frequently. Showers and basin washing facilities shall be located in the locker-room area. /Hydrogen cyanide and cyanide salts/
Eyewash facilities and emergency showers shall be provided in areas where contact with ... cyanide salts as either solids or solutions is likely. Work clothing which has been contaminated by absorption of, or contact with, cyanide shall be thoroughly laundered before it is worn again. /Hydrogen cyanide and cyanide salts/
SRP: Local exhaust ventilation should be applied wherever there is an incidence of point source emissions or dispersion of regulated contaminants in the work area. Ventilation control of the contaminant as close to its point of generation is both the most economical and safest method to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contaminants. Ensure that the local ventilation moves the contaminant away from the worker.
SRP: Contaminated protective clothing should be segregated in a manner such that there is no direct personal contact by personnel who handle, dispose, or clean the clothing. The completeness of the cleaning procedures should be considered before the decontaminated protective clothing is returned for reuse by the workers. Contaminated clothing should not be taken home at the end of shift, but should remain at employee's place of work for cleaning.
Hot Zone Rescuers should be trained and appropriately attired before entering the Hot Zone. If the proper equipment is not available, or if rescuers have not been trained in its use, assistance should be obtained from a local or regional HAZMAT team or other properly equipped response organization. ... Positive-pressure, self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) is recommended in response situations that involve exposure to potentially unsafe levels of hydrogen cyanide. Chemical-protective clothing against hydrogen cyanide is recommended because both hydrogen cyanide vapor and liquid can be absorbed through the skin to produce systemic toxicity.
Victims who have been decontaminated or who have been exposed only to vapor generally pose no serious risks of secondary contamination to rescuers. In such cases, Support Zone personnel require no specialized protective gear.
Patients exposed only to hydrogen cyanide gas who have no eye irritation do not need decontamination. They may be transferred immediately to the Support Zone. Other patients will require decontamination
/In combat/ The only self-aid for hydrogen cyanide (AC) and cyanogen chloride (CK) is to mask. The only buddy-aid for hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen chloride exposure may involve helping a soldier mask. The rapid onset of symptoms may preclude the combat lifesaver/soldier medic from rendering aid. Rapid evacuation to Level 1 medical care and administration of the cyanide treatment set will improve the casualty's chances for survival. ... /Hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen chloride/
All /laboratory/ work with hydrogen cyanide must be confined to hoods, which should have a minimum face velocity of 60 linear ft/min. Whenever work with hydrogen cyanide or related compounds is being carried out in a lab, there should be at least two people in the area at all times. ... all reaction equipment in which cyanides are used or produced should be placed in or over shallow pans so that spills or leaks will be contained.
Gives off irritating or toxic gases in a fire. NO open flames, NO sparks, and NO smoking.
If material not on fire and not involved in fire: Keep sparks, flames,and other sources of ignition away. Keep material out of water sources and sewers. Build dikes to contain flow as necessary. Attempt to stop leak if without undue personnel hazard. Use water spray to knock-down vapors. /Hydrogen cyanide, aqueous solution; Hydrogen cyanide, solution in alcohol; Hydrogen cyanide, stabilized (with less than 3% water); Hydrogen cyanide, stabilized (with less than 3% water absorbed in a porous material)/
Personnel protection. Avoid breathing vapors. Keep upwind. Avoid bodily contact with the material. Do not handle broken packages unless wearing appropriate personal protective equipment. Wash away any material which may have contacted the body with copious amounts of water or soap and water. /Hydrogen cyanide, aqueous solution; Hydrogen cyanide, solution in alcohol; Hydrogen cyanide, stabilized (with less than 3% water); Hydrogen cyanide, stabilized (with less than 3% water absorbed in a porous material)/
If material leaking (not on fire) consider evacuation of one-half (1/2) mile radius based on amount of material spilled, location and weather conditions. /Hydrogen cyanide, aqueous solution; Hydrogen cyanide, solution in alcohol; Hydrogen cyanide, stabilized (with less than 3% water); Hydrogen cyanide, stabilized (with less than 3% water absorbed in a porous material)/
Gas/air mixtures are explosive. /Use/ Closed system, ventilation, explosion-proof electrical equipment and lighting.
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