Chlorotrifluoromethane

CAS RN: 75-72-9

Environmental Fate

TERRESTRIAL FATE: Based on a recommended classification scheme(1), an estimated Koc value of 188(SRC), determined from a measured log Kow of 1.65(2) and a recommended regression-derived equation(3), indicates that chlorotrifluoromethane is expected to have moderate mobility in soil(SRC). Volatilization of chlorotrifluoromethane is expected from moist soil surfaces(SRC) given a measured Henry's Law constant of 1.38 atm-cu m/mole(4). Chlorotrifluoromethane is expected to volatilize rapidly from dry soil surfaces based on a vapor pressure of 2.14X10+4 mm Hg(SRC) at 25 deg C(5). Highly chlorinated/fluorinated compounds are not expected to biodegrade rapidly(6).
AQUATIC FATE: Based on a recommended classification scheme(1), an estimated Koc value of 188(SRC), determined from a measured log Kow of 1.65(2) and a recommended regression-derived equation(3), indicates that chlorotrifluoromethane is not expected to adsorb to suspended solids and sediment in water(SRC). Chlorotrifluoromethane is expected to volatilize rapidly from water surfaces(3) based on a measured Henry's Law constant of 1.38 atm-cu m/mole(4). Estimated half-lives for a model river and model lake are 3 and 97 hours, respectively(SRC). According to a classification scheme(5), an estimated BCF value of 10(3,SRC), from the measured log Kow(2), suggests that bioconcentration in aquatic organisms is low(SRC). Highly chlorinated/fluorinated compounds are not expected to biodegrade rapidly(6).
ATMOSPHERIC FATE: According to a model of gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds in the atmosphere(1), chlorotrifluoromethane, which has a measured vapor pressure of 2.14X10+4 mm Hg at 25 deg C(2), is expected to exist solely as a vapor in the ambient atmosphere. Vapor-phase chlorotrifluoromethane is slowly degraded in the atmosphere by reaction with photochemically-produced hydroxyl radicals(SRC); the half-life for this reaction in air is estimated to be about 62 years(3,SRC). This compound will gradually diffuse into the stratosphere above the ozone layer where it will slowly degrade due to direct photolysis from UV-C radiation and contribute to the catalytic removal of stratospheric ozone(4,SRC). The half-life for this reaction has been estimated to range from 180 to 450 years(4).
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